Cybersecurity Professional

Cybersecurity Professional

The modern financial services sector relies heavily on web-based technologies to serve customers’ needs. Cybersecurity Professionals are vital for protecting an enterprise’s digital infrastructure and assets from both internal and external cyber threats, which can undermine business operations and violate both customer privacy and organizational security. Professionals in this field are referred to by many different titles, including Cybersecurity Engineer, Security Researcher, Information Security Analyst, Security Specialist, Malware Analyst, Computer Forensics Expert, Incident Manager and Risk Analyst, among others.

ROLE-AT-A-GLANCE
Binoculars
Demand Outlook
*

As companies increasingly rely on complex technology to drive their businesses, demand for Cybersecurity Professionals increases exponentially, with global talent shortfalls projected for the foreseea

Diploma
Education & Credentials
*

College diploma or undergraduate degree typically required.

Data chart
Quantitative Skills Required
*
Group of people
Interpersonal Skills & Relationship Management
*
Multiple devices Specialized Technology Skills
*
Desktop area Work Environment

Office; unplanned overtime common

ROLE-AT-A-GLANCE
Binoculars
Demand Outlook
*

As companies increasingly rely on complex technology to drive their businesses, demand for Cybersecurity Professionals increases exponentially, with global talent shortfalls projected for the foreseea

Diploma
Education & Credentials
*

College diploma or undergraduate degree typically required.

Data chart
Quantitative Skills Required
*
Group of people
Interpersonal Skills & Relationship Management
*
Multiple devices Specialized Technology Skills *
Desktop area Work Environment

Office; unplanned overtime common


WHAT IT IS

Key Role Dimensions

Acting as a subject matter expert: Have specialized expertise in areas such as computer programming and engineering, math, statistics and data mining.

Monitoring online threats: Work with advanced tools and systems while attempting to minimize the impact of successful cyber-attacks.

Developing best-practice methods for protecting information systems and networks: Engage in software development, testing, industry risk management, and asset and identity protection.

Advising stakeholders on threats and potential remedies: Convey findings and recommended courses of action to team members and management.

Focus Areas

Cybersecurity Professionals can apply their talents in the following ways in the banking, insurance, and finance and asset management sectors:

  • Prevention: Verify stability and integrity of networks to ensure protection of finances and corporate and personal data from cyber-attacks.
  • Damage Control: Mitigate damage from successful cyber-attacks.
  • Forensic Response: Conduct cyber-forensics investigations into network breaches.
  • Regulatory Compliance: Ensure security policies comply with regulations.

WHAT IT TAKES TO SUCCEED

Key Job Accountabilities

Cybersecurity Professionals generally engage in:

Cybersecurity Environmental Awareness:

  • Oversee usage of programs and applications on the company’s network and prevent usage of unapproved software.
  • Update application and operating system software with the most current releases.
  • Stay current on industry cybersecurity threats, including the latest viruses and malware.

Intrusion Detection:

  • Use an intrusion detection system (usually a device or software application) to monitor networks for breaches.
  • Lead or contribute to investigations into security breaches.

Development of Secure Software:

  • Develop secure coding (developing software in-house may have advantages in terms of cost and flexibility).
  • Test risk assessment procedures.

Penetration Testing:

  • Run real-time simulations and scenarios across complex data sets in both structured and unstructured form.
  • Conduct ethical hacking exercises to determine network vulnerabilities.

Knowledge, Skills & Experience

Must-haves:

  • Exceptional proficiency in analysis, forensics and reverse engineering to monitor and diagnose malware events and vulnerability issues
  • Ability to design firewalls, monitor use of data files, and regulate access to safeguard information and network
  • Data Interpretation, Sense-making & Communication Skills: Clearly convey complex findings and recommended courses of action to team members and management
  • Knowledge of investigative procedures and documentation
  • Specific understanding of quality assurance and control practices
  • Understanding of risk forecasting and mitigation techniques
  • Highly detail-oriented by nature
  • Analytical Thinking: Problem-solving and reasoning skills

Nice-to-haves:

  • Previous experience as a Security Analyst or Security Administrator

Education & Credentials

Entry-level positions typically require:

  • College diploma
  • Undergraduate university degree

In the fields of:

  • Computer Science
  • Cybersecurity
  • Network and System Security
  • Information Technology

 More senior positions require:

  • Master’s degree

In the fields of:

  • Applied Computing
  • Information Technology

Programs Offered

McMaster University

Queen’s University

University of Waterloo

Wilfrid Laurier University


WHERE IT CAN TAKE YOU

Career Pathways

There are a number of pathways open to Cybersecurity Professionals through:

  • Increased Seniority: You may progress from a Security Technician, Data Analyst or Security Analyst position to a Security Architect, Security Manager or Security Engineer role, and may eventually aspire to become Chief Information Security Officer (CISO).
  • Move to a Related Field: You may move into another IT specialization such as Systems Developer or Infrastructure Engineer, or step into a Project Manager role.
  • ‘Guru’ or Expert Status: You may choose to leverage your reputation and experience to work as an external cybersecurity analyst.

Future Trends & Impacts

There are several external factors and environmental trends that can influence the demand and qualifications for this role:

  • Evolution of Cyber Threats: Cyber-attacks and threats will only become more sophisticated and challenging to combat as time goes on.
  • Technological Advances: The rapid pace of changes in cybersecurity technology demands continuous skill and certification upgrades.
  • Business Complexity: The continued dependence of the financial services sector on technology innovation will create ongoing demand for a wide variety of IT security roles.
  • Dynamic Financial Markets: Given the rate at which the business landscape can change, Cybersecurity Professionals must stay current on business trends and conditions.


Looking for personalized career matches?

Complete the Career Assessment tool and find your match to in-demand careers that Toronto employers are hiring for. Completely free!

Find your career match